Tag Archives: training

Creating A Dyslexia-Friendly Workplace

Creating a dyslexia-friendly workplace not only helps support existing dyslexic staff but can even make your business stand out and attract new employees from a wider pool of talent. Being dyslexia-friendly means a mixture of practice, assistance, and understanding across the whole workplace. However, it is not as difficult as it sounds, and these four quick tips will go a long way to making sure your workplace is dyslexia-friendly.

 

  • Nominate dyslexia experts

 

Nominate members of staff who have a good understanding of dyslexia to act as experts to support staff with dyslexia. Having someone with a good understanding of the condition will help ease the pressure of having to speak up and address any issues when needed.

 

  • Educate Employees

 

It shouldn’t just be down to your chosen dyslexia experts to offer support and understanding for employees with learning difficulties. Instead look to educate and train all staff about the effects of dyslexia and create a supportive culture. Supporting dyslexic employees will lower stress and could help prevent absenteeism. Not only can a supportive environment prevent these negative effects but it will allow your dyslexic employees to thrive so you can draw on their particular skills and talents, such as creative thinking and a different perspective in the workplace.

 

  • Assistive Technology

Assistive technology can help offer practical support to dyslexic staff, but why stop there? You could consider implementing assistive technology across your business so as not to single out dyslexic staff while also allowing others to use the tech to improve their own performance. Vocendi offer a range of assistive technology solutions that you could use, which are tailored to your own specific needs, rather than a one-size-fits-all approach.

 

  • Promote

 

Finally, don’t be afraid to promote yourself as a dyslexia-friendly employer. Let your staff know that there is assistive technology available – especially during the recruitment and induction process. Make your support part of your culture rather than something ‘special’ for specific staff. Make it clear that you are dyslexia-friendly and you will not only offer support for existing staff but can also encourage recruitment from a wider talent pool than other employers.

 

The Personal Touch – With Assistive Technology

Assistive Technology or ‘A.T.’ is specialist technology that helps support those with disabilities and learning needs. It can be either software or hardware and can be awarded through either Disabled Students Allowance (DSA) or Access To Work (ATW) schemes.

 

Designed to help students and employees overcome any difficulties they may have, for example with dyslexia, ADHD, or autism, Assistive Technology comes in a number of different forms depending on requirements.

 

However, since everyone is unique, Vocendi believe that any Assistive technology support should be matched to the needs of the individual, rather than seeking a ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution, as is favoured by some other providers.

 

In fact, Vocendi offer one-to-one training sessions where an individual’s needs can be assessed so that the best solution can be found for each person. This holistic approach offers users a unique experience tailored for them rather than trying to cut corners to get as many people on board as possible without actually doing much to really help.

 

Vocendi make sure that our trainers have the rights skills and experience to offer this personal touch when it comes to Assistive Technology. With this in mind, we have implemented a competency framework to monitor and assess our team to ensure that service users have the best possible experience.

 

We believe that everyone has the right to reach their full potential and that far from being a burden, those who require Assistive Technology have a great deal to offer just as long as there is the help required to achieve this potential.

 

Of course, the Equality Act means that discriminating against someone in the workplace because of a condition like dyslexia is illegal and reasonable adjustments are expected to be made by an employer to prevent this.

 

The same can be said for those who are studying, with Disabled Students Allowance designed to help people be all they can rather than being side-lined due to disability or a learning difficulty.

 

You can find out more about our services and how they can help you right here on Vocendi.com – don’t settle for less, be all you can with Assistive Technology and support!

Lifting The Lid On Hidden Disabilities

As people, it seems that many of us are guilty of ignoring what we can’t see. This can be seen in how so many are happy to ignore the plight of the poverty-stricken, refugees, homeless, and others in similar situations. So long as it doesn’t impact on our daily lives, it seems that many people are happy to carry on as if these things don’t exist.

 

However, it is not just societal ills that people turn a blind eye to – but also things such as mental health issues and hidden disabilities such as dyslexia. While we wouldn’t berate someone in a wheelchair for not being able to climb a flight of stairs, it is all too easy to ignore the less-obvious disabilities and issues that others may face.

 

A large part of this is because conditions such as dyslexia are not immediately obvious, often went unrecognised, and were frequently misrepresented as someone not trying, or being ‘stupid.’ Of course, things have steadily improved over the years, but our ability to recognise and appreciate the effects of hidden disabilities still leaves a lot to be desired.

 

Fortunately, with anti-discrimination laws in place, it is becoming harder for employers and others in positions of power to discriminate against those with conditions like dyslexia, dyspraxia, and ADHD. In fact, employers are now required to take reasonable steps to accommodate and support those with these types of conditions.

 

It is not just in the workplace that there have been advances in supporting those with such conditions, but there is also a great deal that can be done to help students to thrive and reach their true potential despite of their dyslexia, ADHD, or other hidden disability.

 

Assistive technology has helped immensely, and is something that we at Vocendi take seriously, but it is not just a question of throwing technology at the problem. It is also about attitudes. As employers, teachers and tutors become more aware of hidden disabilities and how to support those with them, so we are all able to better see the potential of those who have them. Far from being judged by a condition, we can now look to the strengths rather than dwell on the difficulties.

 

Out of sight, out of mind may still be a real attitude problem in our society, but hidden disabilities needn’t and shouldn’t be brushed under the carpet or passed off as something else. It is all about education, knowledge and understanding – not for those with the condition as much as for those without.

 

Just because you can’t see it, doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist!

It’s Dyslexia Awareness Week!

This week is Dyslexia Awareness Week, which means there are a whole host of different activities and events taking place, while the focus this year is on the ‘identification of dyslexia.’ While this week is one of the biggest weeks of the calendar year for dyslexia awareness, the work goes on here at Vocendi all year to help those with the condition.

 

While things have certainly improved when it comes to spotting dyslexia in people (particularly school children) there is still much to do to help battle against the stigma associated with the condition.

 

Some still hold the belief that dyslexics are somehow ‘stupid’ rather than having a condition that impairs their ability to read or work with numbers. Of course, this is plain ignorance and cannot be condoned, just as the belittling of someone with any other type of disability would not be tolerated.

 

However, if dyslexia can be spotted then there is plenty that can be done to alleviate the effects of the symptoms – particularly through the use of Assistive Technology. Again, this is an area where there have been huge improvements over recent years, meaning that with the right help those with dyslexia can be supported fully whether studying or at work.

 

However, Assistive Technology is no good unless you receive the correct training in how to use it – which is something that we can provide at Vocendi.

 

With the right support, training and relevant technology to help there is no need to feel that your disability is holding you back and you can then use your skills to great effect either at work or in college or university.

 

Take a look at our site today to see how we can help you or someone you know to fulfil their potential. Dyslexia needn’t hold you back or be debilitating, as just like with any condition, once recognised you can go about making sure the problem is catered for.

 

So, here’s wishing you all a great Dyslexia Awareness Week and hope that you can use it as inspiration to push forward, find out how you can be supported, and make a difference in your daily life.

New Year, New Studies, New Goals

It’s a new academic year which, for many students means heading back to school, college, or even off to university. Whether you are returning somewhere for another year or starting something afresh, you will want to be prepared to get off to the best possible start.

 

Getting Equipped:

 

The first step in this is making sure you are ready with all the things you might need to see you through the week. Pens, paper, and a sturdy bag to carry your stuff around in is a good starting point, while buying a few new things can also help you to feel like you are making a new start for the academic year – even if you are returning to a course you began last year.

 

If you are returning to a course, it is also worth tidying up your notes from last year. Throwing away any unimportant or unnecessary papers, making sure your work is filed properly, and even going over some old notes to make sure they still make sense may seem like a bit of a waste of time, but it will help refresh your memory ready for the new year, while also giving you a head-start for when it is time to revise later in the year!

 

Of course, it is not just about what you might need for your studies either, you will want to make sure you have a few other items too – tissues (winter is coming!), lip balm, your iPod, money for the bus or lunch, and those other little things that you need each day.

 

Timetables?

 

You will also want to make sure you know where you are going, which means getting your timetable organised. Knowing where you have to be and when takes a lot of the stress out of the day, but your timetable shouldn’t just be a list of where and when your classes are. It is also a good idea to keep track of your deadlines for essays and other work. Keeping a study diary is a good way to do this and make sure you don’t accidentally leave something until the last minute – or forget it entirely!

 

A study timetable can also help out your social life as it will mean you are more organised with your work and therefore able to sort out meeting up with friends and other activities too.

 

Extra Support?

 

You may also want to look for some extra support with your studies by speaking to your college and finding out about what they can offer you if you have a condition such as dyslexia. There is no need for this to hold you back from being all you can be and achieving your goals. You may be eligible for DSA or assistive technology which will help support your studies.

 

At Vocendi we can help with these type of things – from study support to assistive technology training – which means that you can step confidently into the new academic year.

Is Neurodiversity A Trigger For Mental Health Problems?

Could neurodiversity be a trigger for mental health problems, and are neurodivergent people more likely to suffer from mental health problems, and if so, why?

 

It is true that those people who are identified as being autistic are more likely to suffer from anxiety and depression than those who are not seen as being so far along the autistic scale. Of course, it must be recognised that neurodiversity is not in itself a mental illness, but simply the way in which different people’s brains work differently. However, there seems to be a link between neurodiversity and mental health, which is most-likely caused by societal factors and circumstance.

 

For the more neurodivergent among us, it can be stressful to try and ‘fit in’ to a world that seems to be at odds with your way of filtering it. Being sensitive to stimuli like loud working environments, difficulty in reading other people, and so forth can cause anxiety. Meanwhile, having difficulty fitting in or finding a suitable job can lead to depression among those with autism and other conditions.

 

However, this can be helped by taking some simple steps to recognise the needs of neurodiverse groups and acting to make changes to suit them in their day-to-day lives, whether that is studying or at work.

 

It is time that we accepted our differences and realised that they are not faults, but rather something that can add to the diversity of human life. It is our differences that should become our greatest strengths as we work together, using our various skills to support one-another.

 

Rather than alienating the neurodivergent sections of society in an ill-conceived bid to make everyone ‘normal’ we should be ready to understand that neurodiversity is not an illness to be cured, but rather a different way of thinking that we can appreciate and accept.

 

With more acceptance, understanding, and support we would surely see a drop in cases of anxiety and depression among the neurodiverse – which is surely a win-win situation for everyone involved.

Employers Recognising The Benefits Of Autistic Staff

An increasing number of employers are recognising the real benefits of employing staff who are on the autistic spectrum. Of course, it could be argued that we are all somewhere on the autistic spectrum, but those with autistic traits have been found to outperform those employees without in some areas – leading to employers seeking them out.

 

However, in order to reap the benefits of this relatively untapped workforce, employers may need to make a few changes. The manner of communication in the workplace may need to change, with a need for managers to be more precise and less ambiguous when communicating with autistic staff. That being said, this clearer, more concise communication style has been found to be favoured by many non-autistic staff too!

 

It may take extra effort to find the right staff, plus there may be a need to alter working methods to better suit autistic employees, but it has been shown to pay off. One tech company in the U.S., ULTRA testing primarily employs autistic people, looking for staff who have relevant skills such as analytical reasoning and pattern recognition rather than being hung up on previous experience. ULTRA co-founder, Rajesh Anadan said that his employees often outperformed those from other companies. For example, their staff found 56% more bugs during software tests for IBM than IBM’s own staff had!

 

Other tech companies have followed suit by actively seeking to employ those who are on the autistic spectrum, including Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard. Of course, not everybody with autism wants to work in science, technology, engineering or maths (STEM) based careers, but character traits associated with autism have been shown to benefit employers in a wide range of different careers, including banking, healthcare, and consulting.

 

Companies are finding that with the right hiring processes they can tap into the reputed talents of those with autism, including focus, loyalty and a great attention to detail. However, to do this, an employer needs to work to support autistic employees – including making sure not to have interview processes that will alienate those with autism.

 

Given the right support, autistic employees have been shown to be a loyal and talented asset for businesses to tap into – creating strong workforces and offering great employment opportunities to autistic people.

 

Vocendi can offer training and support for autistic people in the workplace – just have a look around the website to find out more.