Tag Archives: spelling

Dyslexia Is Not An Illness Or An Injury

Dyslexia is not an illness or an injury – it is not something that you can ‘get better’ from, but is a learning difference which means you need to approach some things differently. Nor does dyslexia mean that you are ‘less intelligent’ than someone else – but using the same judgments for those with and those without dyslexia creates an unfair playing field.

 

Perhaps to use physical terms (even though your brain is, in effect, just another organ) you wouldn’t ask someone with poor eyesight to just try to look harder or someone who was wheelchair-bound that they just weren’t trying hard enough.

 

Instead, just like wearing glasses, people with dyslexia may need some assistance with some tasks. Again, like those glasses you may use to help you see, so there is technology available to help those with learning differences like dyslexia to get along in a world that isn’t always designed to suit.

 

The law requires that workplaces make ‘reasonable adjustments’ to help those with dyslexia to do their job and the range of support available to students has never been better, yet there still remains a great level of misunderstanding about things like dyslexia.

 

If these types of difference are not recognised and acted upon then we will continue to see a society where those with dyslexia, autism, ADHD and other similar neurodiversities will be marginalised or simply treated as being ‘stupid.’

 

In fact, tests have shown this to be far from the case, and some employers are going out of their way to court neurodivergent employees in order to make the most of any differences in thought pattern and levels of creativity.

 

So, rather than seeing those with dyslexia as having something ‘wrong’ with them, like a broken leg that can be set and fixed, we need to recognise that dyslexia is merely a difference – just like your hair or eye colour, except that it is a difference with how your brain is wired. Not better, not worse, just different – with its own benefits and drawbacks.

 

Dyslexia is not something that we need to ‘cure,’ it is something that we need to accommodate in a world that all-too-often is just not designed with dyslexics in mind. Only when we do this can we unlock potential and fully appreciate the great benefits that neurodiversity can bring.

The Personal Touch – With Assistive Technology

Assistive Technology or ‘A.T.’ is specialist technology that helps support those with disabilities and learning needs. It can be either software or hardware and can be awarded through either Disabled Students Allowance (DSA) or Access To Work (ATW) schemes.

 

Designed to help students and employees overcome any difficulties they may have, for example with dyslexia, ADHD, or autism, Assistive Technology comes in a number of different forms depending on requirements.

 

However, since everyone is unique, Vocendi believe that any Assistive technology support should be matched to the needs of the individual, rather than seeking a ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution, as is favoured by some other providers.

 

In fact, Vocendi offer one-to-one training sessions where an individual’s needs can be assessed so that the best solution can be found for each person. This holistic approach offers users a unique experience tailored for them rather than trying to cut corners to get as many people on board as possible without actually doing much to really help.

 

Vocendi make sure that our trainers have the rights skills and experience to offer this personal touch when it comes to Assistive Technology. With this in mind, we have implemented a competency framework to monitor and assess our team to ensure that service users have the best possible experience.

 

We believe that everyone has the right to reach their full potential and that far from being a burden, those who require Assistive Technology have a great deal to offer just as long as there is the help required to achieve this potential.

 

Of course, the Equality Act means that discriminating against someone in the workplace because of a condition like dyslexia is illegal and reasonable adjustments are expected to be made by an employer to prevent this.

 

The same can be said for those who are studying, with Disabled Students Allowance designed to help people be all they can rather than being side-lined due to disability or a learning difficulty.

 

You can find out more about our services and how they can help you right here on Vocendi.com – don’t settle for less, be all you can with Assistive Technology and support!

Lifting The Lid On Hidden Disabilities

As people, it seems that many of us are guilty of ignoring what we can’t see. This can be seen in how so many are happy to ignore the plight of the poverty-stricken, refugees, homeless, and others in similar situations. So long as it doesn’t impact on our daily lives, it seems that many people are happy to carry on as if these things don’t exist.

 

However, it is not just societal ills that people turn a blind eye to – but also things such as mental health issues and hidden disabilities such as dyslexia. While we wouldn’t berate someone in a wheelchair for not being able to climb a flight of stairs, it is all too easy to ignore the less-obvious disabilities and issues that others may face.

 

A large part of this is because conditions such as dyslexia are not immediately obvious, often went unrecognised, and were frequently misrepresented as someone not trying, or being ‘stupid.’ Of course, things have steadily improved over the years, but our ability to recognise and appreciate the effects of hidden disabilities still leaves a lot to be desired.

 

Fortunately, with anti-discrimination laws in place, it is becoming harder for employers and others in positions of power to discriminate against those with conditions like dyslexia, dyspraxia, and ADHD. In fact, employers are now required to take reasonable steps to accommodate and support those with these types of conditions.

 

It is not just in the workplace that there have been advances in supporting those with such conditions, but there is also a great deal that can be done to help students to thrive and reach their true potential despite of their dyslexia, ADHD, or other hidden disability.

 

Assistive technology has helped immensely, and is something that we at Vocendi take seriously, but it is not just a question of throwing technology at the problem. It is also about attitudes. As employers, teachers and tutors become more aware of hidden disabilities and how to support those with them, so we are all able to better see the potential of those who have them. Far from being judged by a condition, we can now look to the strengths rather than dwell on the difficulties.

 

Out of sight, out of mind may still be a real attitude problem in our society, but hidden disabilities needn’t and shouldn’t be brushed under the carpet or passed off as something else. It is all about education, knowledge and understanding – not for those with the condition as much as for those without.

 

Just because you can’t see it, doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist!

It’s Dyslexia Awareness Week!

This week is Dyslexia Awareness Week, which means there are a whole host of different activities and events taking place, while the focus this year is on the ‘identification of dyslexia.’ While this week is one of the biggest weeks of the calendar year for dyslexia awareness, the work goes on here at Vocendi all year to help those with the condition.

 

While things have certainly improved when it comes to spotting dyslexia in people (particularly school children) there is still much to do to help battle against the stigma associated with the condition.

 

Some still hold the belief that dyslexics are somehow ‘stupid’ rather than having a condition that impairs their ability to read or work with numbers. Of course, this is plain ignorance and cannot be condoned, just as the belittling of someone with any other type of disability would not be tolerated.

 

However, if dyslexia can be spotted then there is plenty that can be done to alleviate the effects of the symptoms – particularly through the use of Assistive Technology. Again, this is an area where there have been huge improvements over recent years, meaning that with the right help those with dyslexia can be supported fully whether studying or at work.

 

However, Assistive Technology is no good unless you receive the correct training in how to use it – which is something that we can provide at Vocendi.

 

With the right support, training and relevant technology to help there is no need to feel that your disability is holding you back and you can then use your skills to great effect either at work or in college or university.

 

Take a look at our site today to see how we can help you or someone you know to fulfil their potential. Dyslexia needn’t hold you back or be debilitating, as just like with any condition, once recognised you can go about making sure the problem is catered for.

 

So, here’s wishing you all a great Dyslexia Awareness Week and hope that you can use it as inspiration to push forward, find out how you can be supported, and make a difference in your daily life.

Making Assistive Technology Usable

Assistive Technology is a great tool for those people who need to cope with conditions such as dyslexia – whether as students or in the workplace.

 

However, creating such technologies is one thing, but making them user-friendly and worthwhile is quite another. Quite simply, no matter how good a tool seems to be, it is only any good if people find it is usable and decide that it will make their work easier to complete.

 

A 2001 study showed that there is definitely a need for decent Assistive Technology, as those with disabilities were found to take around three times as long to complete 4 common web-based tasks than a control group who didn’t need any assistance.

 

The findings of this study demonstrated that those using screen readers or screen magnifiers were hampered in the time it took to complete the tasks, which highlighted a real problem for users of Assistive Technology – if the tools are actually proving to be slower than not using anything, then why bother?

 

Even Stephen Hawking was shown to struggle with software improvements made to his communication systems in 2012. As one of the greatest minds in Britain, if not the world, it was telling that even he decided to go back to his old systems as he found the new ‘improvements’ confusing to use.

 

In order for Assistive Technology to make a difference in the lives of users it needs to be both useful and easy to use. This means that users need to get the correct training in how to use the technology, but only when the need to complete a task matches the time it will take and the effort needed to use the Assistive Technology can it be called worthwhile.

 

It is a matter of making sure that any technology takes account of the time, effort, and even the stigma associated with using the tool to make it truly usable.

 

So how can this be achieved?

 

There needs to be decent access to any Assistive Technology tools, as well as improved awareness of what is available. But even this is not enough, as the tools also need to provide the right levels of functionality required by users. This may require good technical support to help in their use and, ideally, Assistive Technology should be developed with the involvement of users.

 

Assistive Technology is only any use if it actually helps complete a task more efficiently than without it because, quite frankly, why else would anyone bother?

What Is Mind-Mapping – & What Can It Do For You?

You may have heard of ‘mind-mapping’ but not really know what it is. A Mind Map is a way of noting down thoughts, ideas, and concepts in a way that it much more visual than traditional written notes. Using graphics to represent ideas, rather than words, mind-mapping engages your brain in more ways than a regular linear text – making it ideal for anything from note-taking, planning, brainstorming, and study, to research, creativity, and problem-solving.

 

What Is A Mind Map?

 

The best way to explain what a mind map looks like is to look up a picture online (try an image search for ‘mind map’ – it should bring up plenty of examples). But, generally speaking, a mind map will start with your basic idea or problem in the middle of the page, with different ideas, concepts, or information branching off in various directions.

 

You can use colour on each sub-section, pictures, and other graphics to help make the mind map more visual, and don’t be afraid to change text size and style as you see fit. You don’t need to be a great artist, it is all about getting the information down in a visual way, so the more visual clues you can include, the better.

 

The best mind maps are concise, so keep your topics short – a single word or just a picture may do the job and keep your mind map effective.

 

Your mind map doesn’t have to be done on paper either, as there are a number of mind mapping software programs like MindView and Inspiration.

 

The Benefits:

 

The main benefit of mind mapping is that the way the information is presented is structured in way that resembles how your brain actually works. A mind map engages your brain in a number of different ways (cognitive, creative), which means that information is much easier to take in while also sparking your creativity.

 

While there has been a focus on mind mapping and neurodiversity, mind maps are a great tool for everybody – whether at work, in college, or even for working out plans in your personal life!

 

In fact, pretty much anything that you want to summarise, consider, brainstorm, or note down can be turned into a mind map – so why not ditch the text and start using mind mapping instead?

 

An Introduction to Text-to-Speech Software

Text-to-Speech software is a great tool for those who may struggle with conditions like dyslexia, but what is it exactly and how does it work?

 

Quite simply, the software will read documents back to you so that you can listen to the words on a page rather than having to read them yourself. Not only is this great for dyslexics, but it can be useful for other users too – allowing you to sit back and listen to long documents rather than staring at your computer screen. It can even let you get on with doing something else while you take in information from a document.

 

Not only does text-to-speech software allow you to listen to existing documents, but it can also help when you are typing documents of your own.

 

With tools such as spell-checking and word prediction, text-to-speech programs offer many of the types of assistance that you would find in regular word-processing programs. Text-to-speech can also be set to spot things like homophones. These are words that are pronounced the same as another word but has a different meaning or spelling – like two, too, and to. Plus, the addition of having your words read back to you can really help with matters like punctuation.

 

Text-to-speech software generally uses a toolbar at the top of the screen, including buttons like play and stop, making them clear and easy to use.

 

The speech can either be set to work with every word you type or, alternatively, it can read back entire sentences when you type a full-stop.  Great for proof-reading, you can even download the text as an MP3 file to listen to later. You can even pick between a variety of voices and accents so that you can find one you like!

 

Using text-to-speech software can greatly improve the speed and accuracy of not just your reading but also writing your own reports for work, college assignments, and more.

 

Generally-speaking, text-to-speech software comes in three different varieties. Firstly, the is ‘universal’ software, which can be used on any existing program. The second type comes as an add-on to an existing program, like word. Finally, there are stand-alone software programs, which are often free and come with their own dedicated word-processing systems, although these may include additional upgrades which can be bought.