Creating A Dyslexia-Friendly Workplace

Creating a dyslexia-friendly workplace not only helps support existing dyslexic staff but can even make your business stand out and attract new employees from a wider pool of talent. Being dyslexia-friendly means a mixture of practice, assistance, and understanding across the whole workplace. However, it is not as difficult as it sounds, and these four quick tips will go a long way to making sure your workplace is dyslexia-friendly.

 

  • Nominate dyslexia experts

 

Nominate members of staff who have a good understanding of dyslexia to act as experts to support staff with dyslexia. Having someone with a good understanding of the condition will help ease the pressure of having to speak up and address any issues when needed.

 

  • Educate Employees

 

It shouldn’t just be down to your chosen dyslexia experts to offer support and understanding for employees with learning difficulties. Instead look to educate and train all staff about the effects of dyslexia and create a supportive culture. Supporting dyslexic employees will lower stress and could help prevent absenteeism. Not only can a supportive environment prevent these negative effects but it will allow your dyslexic employees to thrive so you can draw on their particular skills and talents, such as creative thinking and a different perspective in the workplace.

 

  • Assistive Technology

Assistive technology can help offer practical support to dyslexic staff, but why stop there? You could consider implementing assistive technology across your business so as not to single out dyslexic staff while also allowing others to use the tech to improve their own performance. Vocendi offer a range of assistive technology solutions that you could use, which are tailored to your own specific needs, rather than a one-size-fits-all approach.

 

  • Promote

 

Finally, don’t be afraid to promote yourself as a dyslexia-friendly employer. Let your staff know that there is assistive technology available – especially during the recruitment and induction process. Make your support part of your culture rather than something ‘special’ for specific staff. Make it clear that you are dyslexia-friendly and you will not only offer support for existing staff but can also encourage recruitment from a wider talent pool than other employers.